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Evaluating Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

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There is a high incidence of evaluating penetrating abdominal trauma in several nations. The most prevalent causes include being stabbed or shot with a gun.

Small bowel injury accounts for fifty percent of all cases, whereas large bowel injury accounts for forty percent, liver injury accounts for thirty percent, and intra-abdominal vascular injury accounts for twenty-five percent.

When an injury is inflicted at close range, there is a greater amount of kinetic energy than when an injury is sustained at a distance. High-energy wounds are connected with unexpected effects, despite the fact that the majority of gunshot wounds have a linear projection in most cases.

Additionally, there is a possibility of secondary missile injuries caused by bone shards or bullet fragments. It might be difficult to determine the severity of a stab wound that penetrates the abdominal wall.

It is possible to overlook occult injuries, which may lead to delayed consequences that can add to the severity of the morbidity.

COPYRIGHT_SPINE: Published on https://spinal-injury.net/evaluating-penetrating-abdominal-trauma/ by Dr. Bill Butcher on 2022-10-05T00:34:53.011Z

Evaluating Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

Routine laparotomies have typically been used to treat penetrating abdominal injuries. A move to non-operative therapy for suitable patients has been made possible by new knowledge of trajectories, the possibility of organ harm, and correlation with better radiographic imaging.

For knife wounds, a specific method has been developed, however, there is still debate about how to treat abdominal gunshot wounds. The reasoning and approach for choosing patients for non-operative care are in this article.

The use of colostomies vs. primary repair for colon injuries, care of asymptomatic thoracic abdominal injuries, and other contentious topics are also covered in this article.

Evaluation

Gross evaluation could be challenging since interior injury is frequent. After a physical examination, the patient should have an ultrasound, x-ray, and/or CT scan. A paper clip may sometimes be put over entrance and exit wounds prior to an x-ray.

Blood transfusions or intravenous fluids are used to treat the patient. Impaled things must often be removed surgically, they are fixed in place to prevent movement and should only be removed in an operating theater.

Although foreign objects like bullets may be removed, they should be kept in place if there is a chance that they might do further harm. To get rid of tissue that can't survive and will become infected, wounds are debrided.

ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

Prophylactic Antibiotics For Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

PAI uses antibiotics to decrease postoperative infection. Timing, duration, and choice of antibiotics are still debatable, although most doctors choose a single-broad agent given over 24 hours post-operatively.

Fabian et al studied 515 PAI patients given 2 g cefoxitin or cefotetan for 24 hours or 5 days. Abscesses, necrotizing fasciitis, and widespread peritonitis are MAI. MAI of Colon, 24 hours, 14%; 5 days, 15%, did not vary between groups.

They determined that 24-hour antibiotic treatment is sufficient for all PAI patients, independent of contamination or damage severity.

Bozorgzadeh et al randomized 300 PAI patients to 1 gm intravenous cefoxitin for 24 hours or 5 days. Again, there was no postoperative mortality or change in an inpatient stay. Antibiotic treatment duration had no effect on infection (p = 0.135) or intra-abdominal infection (p = 0.336).

Only colon damage predicted intra-abdominal infection (p=0.0031). 24 hours of intravenous cefoxitin vs. 5 days of treatment did not affect postoperative infection or hospitalization time.

In another prospective randomized research, Cornwell et al treated 63 high-risk patients (PAI with full thickness colon damage and one of the following: PATI > 25, transfusion of 6 units or more of packed red blood cells, or >4 hours from injury to surgery) with 24 hours vs. 5 days of 2 gm cefoxitin.

Intra-abdominal (24 hour, 19%; 5-days, 38%) and extra-abdominal (24 hour, 45%; 5-days, 25%) infection rates did not vary between the two groups. Even in high-risk PAI patients, prolonging preventive antibiotics beyond 24 hours is ineffective.

People Also Ask

How Do You Evaluate Penetrating Trauma?

Check for penetrating wounds, spine step-offs, bruising, and bone soreness. Test cranial nerves, strength, sensitivity, coordination, and reflexes.

What Are The Elements Of Penetrating Trauma?

Penetrating trauma causes crushing, stretching, and cavitating damage. The precise mix of these three components relies on the object's form, size, mass, velocity, and tissue type(s).

What Is The Difference Between Penetrating Abdominal And Blunt Abdominal Trauma?

Blunt or penetrating trauma are common. Blunt injuries are produced by blunt impact or force. Penetrating injuries include stabbings and gunshot wounds.

Conclusion

We hope the information in this article provided would be beneficial for you in evaluating penetrating abdominal trauma. Let us know if there's anything we've forgotten to mention. Your comments will be read and responded to with great interest.

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About The Authors

Dr. Bill Butcher

Dr. Bill Butcher - With more than two decades of experience, Dr. Bill Butcher aims to provide a repository for educational materials, sources of information, details of forthcoming events, and original articles related to the medical field and about health subjects that matter to you. His goal is to help make your life better, to help you find your way when faced with healthcare decisions, and to help you feel better about your health and that of your family. Bill received his medical degree at Boston University School of Medicine and spent his entire career helping people find the health and medical information, support, and services they need. His mission is to help millions of people feel fantastic by restoring them to optimal health.

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